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The cost of a tailored suit and the time required for a tailored suit......

Can the above be written as follow:

  1. The cost and time required for a tailored suit ......

  2. The cost of and time required for a tailored suit ......

migrated from english.stackexchange.com Jul 9 at 11:48

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All of those sentences are grammatical.

However, the original is stylistically awkward, and 1 could be taken ambiguously.

The cost and time required for a tailored suit.

This is what you want to express. But it could also be taken differently:

The (cost and time) required for a tailored suit.

→ The cost required and time required for a tailored suit.

Note that it's also ambiguous if for applies to both cost and time required or just to time required.


Of the sentences presented, 2 seems the most direct.

Normal parsing of the parallel structure of the sentence would be:

The cost of and time required for a tailored suit.

Adding of makes it clear that each noun has its own preposition.

This most directly matches the original sentence, so it's likely the better sentence, but it, too, is slightly awkward.


Another possibility is to rephrase the sentence by reversing the elements and using a possessive instead of prepositions:

A tailored suit's cost and required time . . .

This is unambiguous and even simpler to parse.

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The word 'of' is a preposition and what usually precedes this would be a noun or pronoun (as can be seen in the first sentence where 'a tailored suit' is the pronoun. 'and' being a conjunction means that #2 is not a gramatically correct sentence. #1 is correct though.

  • When you say "this is not a grammatically correct sentence", which phrase are you referring to? #1 or #2 – katatahito Jul 9 at 7:12
  • thanks for helping me clarify my answer! – Chowder Jul 9 at 7:21
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1 is correct, and you can think of it this way:

If you separate those two details, you're left with-

a) The cost required for a tailored suit.

b) The time required for a tailored suit.

Both of these are acceptable.

If you went with #2, you'd have:

a) The cost of required for a tailored suit. (The "Of" no longer fits)

b) The time required for a tailored suit.

When listing prerequisite nouns in this way, nouns that can be quantified in the same way don't need to be separated. That includes most nouns, leaving the flexibility for you to emphasize one.

For example, If you wish to stress that a tailored suit is labor-intensive, you might write:

The cost, time, and the amount of work required for a tailored suit.

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