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Tell me please if I need to include the preposition with in the following sentence?

I need something to write (with). Could anyone give me a pen?

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I need something to write with = I need to write something, but I need something I could use to write that something down on a paper such as a pen on a pencil.

I need something to write = I need to write something about something or someone such as a story or an essay.

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    Interestingly enough, the same interpretations hold when we rearrange the words of each phrase; that is: I need to write with something means "something like a pen or a pencil," while I need to write something means "something like a short story or essay."
    – J.R.
    Jul 10 '19 at 13:51
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Always use prepositions when in doubt. Yes you do need 'with' here. The asking for a pen makes the intention clear. A pen wouldn't help you to find something to write 'about'. And if you had meant this then you would have needed the 'about'.

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To be grammatically correct, the sentence should read: I need something with which to write.

In casual, colloquial speech, the "with" has migrated to the end of the sentence. So: I need something to write with.

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