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When we talk about a general thing and the event in the adverbial clause happens earlier, what tense should we use?

Please help explain a bit, thank you.

Example 1

I usually don't feel terrified after I watch / watched / have watched horror movies.

Example 2

I have a super power. I don't feel tired during the day if I didn't / don't / haven't slept sleep well the night before.

  • The general question is too broad. In different specific constructions, any of the tenses would be fine. In the first example, both watch and have watched work, although watched doesn't. But in a slightly different construction, watched would be fine: I usually didn't feel terrified after I watched horror movies And in this case, the other tenses that worked before now wouldn't work. (It's the difference between don't and didn't in this case that changes the acceptability of the tense that follows—not the fact that the second verb comes after something adverbial.) – Jason Bassford Supports Monica Jul 10 '19 at 15:20
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I usually don't feel terrified after I watch / watched / have watched horror movies.

This example talks about habit (usually). So both verbs are in the present tense:

I usually don't feel terrified after I watch horror movies.

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I agree with the answers above. In addition I'd like to say that "after I have watched" puts emphasis on the time (the hours) after you have finished watching and not on the habit. It is a different way of looking at the sentence.

...during the day if I didn't sleep well the night before. You look back from the day to the night that came before the day so past simple would be appropriate.

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