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Should I always replace "in" for "to" in Perfect Sentences after "to be" forms?

I have been TO America\TO the party

He said he had been TO America\TO the party

When she comes he will have been TO America\TO the party

I knew when she came he would have been TO America\TO the party

If you had been TO America\TO the party, you would have been TO America\TO the party

  • I'm confused because none of your examples use "in," and "in" would not be correct in any of them (unless "party" is used in the sense of a group of people rather than the celebratory/recreational event). Your title is also confusing due to the prepositions: usually we talk about "replacement of X with Y" (X becomes Y). – TypeIA Jul 11 at 9:18
  • I meant I could have written all of it with "in" instead of "to" but I did it with "to". So, it's incorrect to say "I have been to the party"? – Michael Azarenko Jul 11 at 9:27
  • But there's nothing wrong with saying I have been in America. That's a true statement. (If you've been there.) In fact, to use one of your examples, you could say I have been in America at the party. So, the immediate answer to should I always is no. But it's not clear if that's what you really mean to ask. – Jason Bassford Supports Monica Jul 11 at 14:07

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