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We normally use these kinds of sentences:

I need something strong or I have to hire someone intelligent.

Here, the words "strong" and "intelligent" modify the nouns something and someone.So,we can call them adjective.My question is can we use those adjectives before something/someone like below:

I need strong something or I have to hire intelligent someone.

if i unable to do that what are the grammatical rules behind these.Please clarify it.

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Yes, you can do that, but with one qualification. You need to use an article:

I need a strong something.
I have to hire an intelligent someone.

By putting the adjective in front of the pronoun, you end up turning the two words into a noun phrase, and rules for articles in front of nouns take effect. Mass nouns often don't require articles, but neither something nor someone can be considered to be part of a mass noun phrase.


Note that an intelligent someone, while not ungrammatical, is less idiomatic than an intelligent person.

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