0

For example,

  1. Although I know he is honest, I don't like him
  2. Knowing he is honest, I don't like him

I think 2 has the same meaning as 1 even if "although" is omitted because it's most natural to read 2 as 1. What do you think?

2

I would actually interpret these as opposite of each other in a way.

1 -> I don't like him even though he is honest

2 -> I don't like him because he is honest

That said, "Knowing he is honest, I still don't like him" would be equivalent to 1.

  • What about these sentences? (1) Everyone knowing who would have stolen the money, no one dared to say he was the robber and (2) Although everyone knew who would have stolen the money, no one dared to say he was the robber. Do these sentences have the same meaning ? – Zenith Jul 14 at 6:01
  • 1
    The difference between these sentences is definitely more subtle than the originals, but it is there. By applying a similar transformation we can see it more clearly: (1) No one dared say who stole the money because they knew who it was. (2) No one dared say who stole the money even though they knew who it was. In 1 there is a direct correlation between who the robber was and why nobody is saying anything (perhaps they are scared of him?). In 2 they have other reasons for not saying anything (like not wanting to rat out their friend). – WillRoss1 Jul 14 at 6:29

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