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Would you tell me what is the difference between sentences of A and B?

If what you want to talk about is the nice feeling of being finished buying a new car—"It's done! I have bought a new car! I have a new car!", you will say something different tomorrow evening:

[A:]
"It is nice to have bought a new car", OR
"It is nice having bought a new car."

And today you express your expectation of that feeling like this:

[B:]
"It will be nice to have bought a new car", OR
"It will be nice having bought a new car."

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    This passage makes no sense whatever outside of its context. I'm entitled to say that, because I wrote it. – StoneyB on hiatus Apr 21 '14 at 21:59
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    You might find some of the formatting tricks described in this meta question very helpful (particularly the ones about quote boxes and line breaks). – J.R. Apr 22 '14 at 0:59
  • @J.R. I cannot count how many times I suggested this. – Maulik V Apr 22 '14 at 4:26
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A and B speak of the same eventuality at different times.

A: "It is nice to have bought a new car", or "It is nice having bought a new car."

The verb in the main clause of each sentence, is, is cast in the present-tense form. These sentences represent what you say AFTER you have bought the new car about what you feel at that time.

B: "It will be nice to have bought a new car", or "It will be nice having bought a new car."

The verb in the main clause of each sentence, will be, is cast in a form which expresses 'future tense'. These sentences represent what you say BEFORE you buy the new car about what you expect to feel AFTER you have bought it.

There is no present perfect in any of these sentences. The perfect constructions use non-finite forms of HAVEto have (infinitive) and having (gerund/participle)—which do not have any tense. Such non-finite forms head clauses which cannot stand alone but act as complements of the main verb or as modifiers of other constituents.

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So, the thing is, the actual process of buying a car is nothing anyone would be happy about specifically. Also, you would only say 'bought' to differentiate from say stealing or building a car :).

So, a typical speaker of US English would just say:

It's nice to have a new car.

It will be nice to have a new car.

However, if you're talking about what you did today, one would say:

I bought a car today.

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