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Parents have a better understanding for\of their children than schools.

Fathers and mothers have a better knowledge about their children than schools.

Why “a” is used here although “understanding” and ”knowledge” are uncountable? especially that we don't say

Education creates a better children.

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  1. The Cambridge Dictionary says that "an understanding" can be a countable or singular noun, so

Parents have a better understanding for of their children than schools.

is perfectly fine.

  1. The Cambridge Dictionary says that "knowledge" can be a singular or uncountable noun, so

Fathers and mothers have a better knowledge about their children than schools (do).

or

Fathers and mothers have better knowledge about their children than schools (do).

are both fine.

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  • Thank you. This changes everything. However, Understanding can be singular when it means "Sympathy", but it is uncountable when it means "knowledge". I assume that native English speakers always mean Sympathy when they feel that the construction is like "a better understanding", so they feel that it is wrong when I say "better understanding" without a. In other words, do you ever say "better understanding" without "a"?
    – Costa
    Jul 16 '19 at 9:44
  • Maybe: “Alice has reached a better understanding of Advanced algebra. Since her last report card, Carol has reached better understanding of Math, Physics and French, but needs improvement in Spanish.” Jul 16 '19 at 9:59

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