1

1- A: Turn it off.

B: No.

A: Do it now. That's a direct order.

B: Well, you don't want to start a battle of the wills with me because you will emerge from that battle a broken man.

This dialogue is from an american sitcom. What does the marked phrase mean? I think it means after that battle you will be a broken man. But I can't understand the construction of the sentence.


I have researched "emerge from" on internet. I have found more interesting sentences. Still don't get the constructions though.

2- She emerged from the sea, blue with cold.

3- She emerged from the bedroom, a vision in cream silk.

1
  • It should be a direct order. Jul 17, 2019 at 2:17

1 Answer 1

2

My initial answer would be "come out of" as in:

you will come out of that battle a broken man

This agrees with the dictionary definition #5 to rise, as from an ... unfortunate state ...

3
  • Thank you but I still don't get the construction. Leaving that noun phrase- a broken man- at the end of the sentence as is seems awkward to me. I would use a preposition before that phrase as in: "You will emerge from that battle as a broken man." + I even would use a preposition in your sentence: "You will come out of that battle as a broken man" Jul 16, 2019 at 23:00
  • To "emerge from <something> a broken man" is a not too uncommon phrase. You can add the preposition, but to my ear "as a broken man" suggest you are like a broken man. Leaving the preposition off means you ARE a broken man. Does that make sense? I don't have a reference beyond native (mostly American) English speaker.
    – Ron Jensen
    Jul 16, 2019 at 23:33
  • Thank you. Should I use a comma here like the other two example? -"Well, you don't want to start a battle of the wills with me because you will emerge from that battle, a broken man." Jul 17, 2019 at 7:50

You must log in to answer this question.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged .