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When you use the Service we collect IMSI to obtain the network speed so as to display the use condition on the notification bar of your Smartphone and on the interface of the Service, which is part of our Service.

What does "which" in the bold part refer to? Does "which" refer to the act of displaying use condition on the notification bar and on the interface? Or does "which" refer to "the interface of the Service"? I read it from Privacy Policy.

  • It's a relative pronoun, the referent of which (no pun intended) is ambiguous. The only way to know for sure would be to ask the author or get additional context. – Jason Bassford Jul 19 '19 at 3:18
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When you use the service, they collect IMSI to obtain network speed so as to display the use condition on the notification bar of your Smartphone and on the interface of the Service, and they are doing this as a part of their service.

"Which" is referring to the motive of the action, i.e. them collecting IMSI to obtain network speed... and all that.

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The very fact that there are two different answers tells you that there is something wrong with the very complicated sentence quoted by the OP. Cutting out the detail, that sentence says "When you do this, we do that, which is part of our Service". The word 'which' might possibly refer to 'all that' as @Rhythm puts it, but it might equally refer to the whole setup, namely arranging that when you do 'this', 'that' happens.

Muddled language usually means muddled thinking. What was the writer intending to say? We can only guess.

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The antecedent of "which" here is the noun phrase "the interface of the Service", The meaning is that the interface is part of the service.

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