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Is there any difference between how and what in the following sentence?

  1. Anny was just telling Wendy how she liked to eat the ice cream at the shop.

  2. Anny was just telling Wendy what she liked to eat the ice cream at the shop.

Do those mean the same thing? Is one an adjective and the other an adverb?

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    #2 is not grammatical and has no meaning. Can you tell us why you are asking the question, and where you saw or heard such language? – Jim Reynolds Jul 19 at 3:43
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[1] Anny was just telling Wendy [how she liked to eat the ice-cream at the shop].

[2] * Anny was just telling Wendy [what she liked to eat the ice-cream at the shop].

Yes: there is a difference, and no, neither of them is an adjective or an adverb.

In [1] "how" is best analysed as an informal variant of the subordinator "that". Compare Anny was just telling Wendy that she liked to eat the ice-cream at the shop.

[2] is ungrammatical because unlike "that" and the informal "how", "what" is not a subordinator so it cannot introduce declarative content clauses.

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