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I have a doubt regarding the use of the verb "has or have " after who in the following sentence,

I request you my work to be evaluated by Mr. Bender and Mr. Joseph who has expertise in the work done by me.

Please help

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    I request you my work to be is ungrammatical. – Jason Bassford Supports Monica Jul 19 at 8:54
  • @Jason Bassford Could you make it grammatical – English Jul 19 at 10:11
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    I don't know what it's trying to express—it could mean several different things. But the closest I can come up with, which uses most of the words, is I request of you that you have my work evaluated by . . . – Jason Bassford Supports Monica Jul 19 at 10:14
  • @JasonBassford I want to say: I request you that my work should should be evaluated by.... – English Jul 19 at 10:24
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    Then where does you come in? Why isn't it just I request my work be evaluated by Mr. Bender and Mr. Joseph? – Jason Bassford Supports Monica Jul 20 at 19:01
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The way it is written now is indeed confusing. The has suggest that only Mr. Joseph has expertise, but then a comma could've been added:

I request you my work to be evaluated by Mr. Bender, and by Mr. Joseph who has expertise in the work done by me.

This would probably not have confused you.

If both have expertise, you must use have.

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Welcome to Ell Stack.

As you are referring to two people (in third person) in your sentence, you should use the plural verb have after who. You use the singular verb has after who when you are talking about a person (in third person).

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