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The regional unemployment rate ignores the relative number of job vacancies and employee turnovers.

Google returns 450K results for "number of employee turnover" and 230K results for "rate of employee turnover".

According to Collins dictionary, the turnover of people in an organization or place is the rate at which people leave and are replaced.

I am not sure what is the best way to write that X ignores employee turnover. Does it make sense to say ignores the relative number of employee turnovers (given that turnover means a rate)?

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    I'm guessing that you didn't scroll through many pages of those alleged 450K results. By the time I got to Page 3, Google had modified its estimate, and the page read: Page 3 of about 25 results, whereas your other query yielded: Page 31 of about 308 results. Bottom line: Never trust the first number Google returns. – J.R. Jul 22 at 9:31
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Most dictionaries I checked had a definition similar to the one you found:

turnover (n.) the rate at which people leave and are replaced

That's what I found at Lexico and Collins, and Macmillan reads similarly:

turnover (n.) the rate at which people leave a place and new people arrive

However, perhaps informally over time, I suspect that people started to use the word to refer to the people themselves, rather than strictly as the rate, so that it would be acceptable in business circles to say something like, "We had seven turnovers last month," meaning seven people left the company. Indeed, I did find this definition in a business dictionary:

turnover
Human resource management: The number of employees hired to replace those who left or were fired during a 12 month period.

Whether or not such usage would be appropriate in a news article or research paper might depend on how pedantic the intended audience might be. Your search showed there is some precedent, so you wouldn't be the first to use the word that way – but it might be safer to use the word only when referring to a rate.

  • I need to be able to use it correctly. Are you able to tell me how would you use it in the sentence I provided? I can't get a proper fit. – AIQ Jul 22 at 17:18
  • @AIQ - I think I answered your question. You asked: "Does it make sense to say ignores the relative number of employee turnovers (given that turnover means a rate)?" The title asks: "Is it idiomatic to say 'number of employee turnovers'? Or should it be 'rate of employee turnover'?" You do mention: "I am not sure what is the best way to write that X ignores employee turnover," but you don't ask for that in your question, and would I not venture to answer without knowing what X is. – J.R. Jul 22 at 18:17

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