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That said, so long as China's unusually high savings rate persists-about 40% of GDP compared with less than 10% in the U.S.-so too will large surpluses recur in its current account.

How to understand the sentence? What is the function and usage of "too" here?

3 Answers 3

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You need to make your sentence short to understand the structure clearly.

That said, so long as [A] persists, so will [B] -> as long as A persists, B will persist

That said, so long as [A] persists, so too will [B] -> "too" here adds emphasis, and nothing else.

[A] -> China's unusually high savings rate persists

[B] -> large surpluses recur in its current account


Consider this conversation -

Person 1: I will buy this new pen.

Person 2: So will I (This implies "I will buy too")

I hope I have answered your question. Please let me know if you need any more clarification.

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"So too will" If the first event happens it is predicted that the second event will happen as well.

In this case providing the production rate remains the same and the high saving rate continue with the same margin then an equal amount of surplus will be generated.

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  • Like Man From India says, It's fluff.
    – UhlBelk
    Commented Apr 23, 2014 at 3:53
  • Your answer is not wrong. +1 Commented Apr 23, 2014 at 4:00
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In this sentence, "too" is basically a synonym for "also":

[...] so long as China's unusually high savings rate persists [...] 
so *also* will large surpluses recur in its current account.

Note that "so also" is not idiomatic English usage, though technically correct. "Too" used in this way had the added implication of "to that extent also". Thus:

[...] so long as China's unusually high savings rate persists [...] 
so *to that extent also* will large surpluses recur in its current account.

As a side note, "too" could be left out, and the second "so" could have done the same job without it:

[...] so long as China's unusually high savings rate persists [...] 
so will large surpluses recur in its current account.

It's a little archaic sounding, but perfectly correct.

However, when "too" is added, the meaning of "so" shifts, to mean something more like "thus" ("in this way"). Thus:

[...] so long as China's unusually high savings rate persists [...] 
thus to that extent also will large surpluses recur in its current account.

The purpose is thus to intensify the linkage between the identified cause and its proposed consequence.

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