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this question is based on this post.

there are 4 items about Bob's mood (happy and grumpy) and weather (sunny and rainy).

this expression is clear but a little bit boring (same structure).

On a rainy day, Bob is grumpy with a 60 % chance and happy with a 40 % chance.

On a sunny day, Bob is grumpy with a 20 % chance and happy with a 80 % chance.

how can improve this?

is it following expression still clear and readable?

On a rainy day, Bob is grumpy with a 60% chance and happy with a 40% chance.

On a sunny day, the corresponding chances are 20% and 80% respectively.

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The first thing to note is that "Bob is grumpy with a 60% chance" is not the usual way we would express that idea. More idiomatic would be something like:

"Bob has a 60% chance of being grumpy"

But to address your question, the "boring" quality of your example is because so many words are repeated explicitly even though we already know that they are coming.

The easy way to correct that repetition is to leave out some of the words on their second occurrence:

"On a rainy day, Bob has a 60% chance of being grumpy, and a 40% chance of being happy. On a sunny day, he has an 80% chance of being happy." We can do the math on the 80-20 ratio

Taking that process a little further:

"On a rainy day, Bob has a 60% chance of being grumpy, and a 40% chance of being happy. On a sunny day it is 80-20."

You could also vary the sentence structure and replace some of the duplicated words with synonyms:

"On a rainy day, Bob has a 40% chance of being happy, but on sunny days, the probability goes up to 80%."

There are many ways of restating things in a way you will find appropriate.

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Given that these are binary choices, we can say

On a sunny day, the probability that Bob will be grumpy is 20% whereas on a rainy day it is 60%.

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I would rephrase it and turn it into a single sentence:

Bob's chances of being grumpy or happy are 60% and 40% on a rainy day, but 20% and 80% on a sunny day.

Note, too, that if only grumpiness is mentioned (and it's assumed that its negation is happiness), talking only about the grumpiness makes it even shorter and more simplistic:

Bob's chance of being grumpy on a rainy day is 60%, but only 20% on a sunny day.

In the shorter version, we can add only, making the conjunction flow better, because it unambiguously refers to one thing (his grumpiness). We would not be able to use only with the original version because it wouldn't be clear which feeling it was referencing.

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