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the title of section 2.1 of book "Deep Learning and Convolutional Neural Networks for Medical Image Computing" is

Introduction on Deep Learning Methods in Mammography

I see Introduction "to" more than Introduction "on", so, which one is more appropriate and idiomatic?

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    “Introduction to” is the idiomatic expression – Morrison Bower Jul 24 at 15:29
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They mean slightly different things. In this instance, introduction means something that introduces, or is a preliminary, to something else.

: something that introduces: such as

a(1) : a part of a book or treatise preliminary to the main portion

(2) : a preliminary treatise or course of study

If it were "introduction to," instead of "introduction on," the emphasis would not be on what the introduction is about, but what it is supposed to do: help you understand, in this case, deep learning methods in Mammography.

According to Ngram, "introduction to" is vastly more common, but without more context, I can't say which I think is more appropriate.

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It’s almost always “introduction to” a subject, not “introduction on”.

I read a pdf I found of this section of the book, and in context, they should have said “introduction to”. The excerpt I read had a bunch of other minor errors, which makes me think the authors are not native speakers. (Like, they say ‘summary on’ not ‘summary of’.)

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