4

Which one is correct and why?

on my leisure vs at my leisure

Prepositions are always confusing to me. I know that they are based on context apart from its general meaning. I get confused about it.

Generally on is used to denote something situated at a surface, and at to pinpoint a location or time. But is what is the case here?

Additionally, what about in my leisure?

  • Those generalities are just one of many valid usages of those words. There are also a great many idiomatic expressions and phrasal verbs to consider; for example: on the telephone, on the radio, on the panel, on the mark, on the list, on drugs, on a diet, on the house, on tour, on the train, right on time, and eyes on me – none of those expressions have anything to do with "something situated upon a surface". – J.R. Jul 26 '19 at 16:51
9

The Free Dictionary has

at (one's) leisure

Done according to one's own convenience or comfort.
There is no time limit to the exam, so please complete it at your leisure.


Lexico has this

at leisure

1 Not occupied; free.
the rest of the day can be spent at leisure

2 In an unhurried manner.
the poems were left for others to read at leisure


However, a different preposition is used here:

I play steel drums in my leisure time.

But I don't know of any usage using the preposition "on".

| improve this answer | |
  • In my leisure and At my leisure have the same meaning? – Ritwik Bhattacharyya Jul 26 '19 at 7:32
  • 4
    No, the last quote is clearly different, where the preposition "in" is used with "time", and "leisure" is a noun adjunct. – Weather Vane Jul 26 '19 at 9:04
  • Pardon my lack of knowledge, what's noun adjunct? Do you mean if we use 'leisure' with 'time' we should use" in my leisure time"? Is that so? – Ritwik Bhattacharyya Jul 26 '19 at 21:59
  • It is a noun used like an adjective, to qualify a noun. For example in "chicken soup", the "chicken" is a noun adjunct. – Weather Vane Jul 26 '19 at 22:37

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