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Is this a grammatically and syntactically correct sentence?

When you have got to at home you have to get on with the work straight away.

I want to say when a person arrived at home he has to proceed with his work immediately.

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    If you want to say arrive, why don't you say it? When you arrive at home you have to get on with the work straight away. Why have you replaced arrive with have got to? – Jason Bassford Supports Monica Jul 27 at 18:13
  • @Jason Bassford Thank you for the answer. I've changed it because I'm learning get to form. I don't understand what is the difference between get to and arrive – Dron4K Jul 27 at 18:16
  • You can get to a place or you can arrive at a place. But while they essentially mean the same thing, the syntax around them is different. In your example sentence, when you arrive (at) home would be replaced by when you get home. (When you get home you have to get on with the work straight away.) – Jason Bassford Supports Monica Jul 27 at 18:19
  • @Jason Bassford It is more clear now. Thanks a lot – Dron4K Jul 27 at 18:28
  • More idiomatically: You must start work as soon as you get home. – Weather Vane Jul 27 at 18:29
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Generally speaking, you get to a place or you arrive at a place.

So, both of the following would be acceptable:

✔ When you have got to the mall . . .
✔ When you have arrived at the mall . . .

But the combination of both prepositions isn't used:

✘ When you have got to at the mall . . .
✘ When you have arrived at to the mall . . .


The same is true when using home, but with the caveat that, unlike other nouns, a preposition is normally not used with it. (This is because the meaning of home is more nuanced than most other nouns—perhaps because of its additional adjectival sense.)

So, we would have the following:

✔ When we have got to home . . .
✔ When we have arrived at home . . .

Sometimes, a preposition is used, but it's not as common. It's also less common to see got to home than it is to see arrived at home. (I can't explain why this is the case.)

In summary:

✔ When you have got home . . .
? When you have got to home . . .
✘ When you have got to at home . . .

The first sentence is fine, the second is syntactically okay (but might sound strange to some people), and the third is ungrammatical (it's never used).


As a more general comment, changing the tenses used in the example sentence would result in a more natural expression:

When you get home you will have to get on with the work straight away.

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