1

Is it correct and natural to refer to a bar of soap as a "bath accessory"?

If not, what would you call it?

I'm considering a sentence like:

The hotel offers free bath accessories/bathing products.

I'd appreciate your help.

3

In the context you provide, it is helpful to look at Hotel websites:

Looking at some different hotel websites, bath products, bath amenities, or bath necessities are examples of options. To me any of these sound fine, but are ordered in decreasing preference

  • How about "bathing products"? – Apollyon Jul 29 at 1:56
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    bath products sounds more idiomatic, "bathing products" sounds like it is referring exclusively to things used to take a bath, rather than a shower or at the sink. If you want to leave the impression that you think the reader will only be taking baths then bathing products might be fine. But bath products is more catchall and idiomatic. – katatahito Jul 29 at 2:00
  • Doesn't "bath" in "bath products" refer to washing oneself in a bathtub as well? – Apollyon Jul 29 at 4:27
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    Sort of, but not as specifically. "bath" more refers to the general concept of a bathroom. The difference in connotation might have to do with the fact that bathing comes from bathe as opposed to from bathroom. – katatahito Jul 29 at 4:33
4

"bath accessories" suggests towel holders, soap dishes and similar items.

In British English, "complimentary toiletries" would be used.

An invigorating hotel toiletries range that includes a selection of shampoo, soap, body lotion and shower gel.

https://www.hotel-complimentary-products.co.uk/hotel-toiletries

Things like sewing kit or shoe polish might be amenities.

Cole & Lewis Deluxe Toiletries & Amenities Welcome Pack

https://www.outofeden.co.uk/products/1234/cole-and-lewis-deluxe-toiletries-and-amenities-welcome-pack

Hotel Guest Amenities and Accessories

https://www.outofeden.co.uk/category/amenities-and-accessories

  • "Toiletries" is quite correct. As @Katatahito also states, some hotel websites may choose other formations ("bath products") if they think it sounds fancier to avoid saying the word "toilet", however, there is nothing vulgar about the word "toiletries" (also used in Eau de Toilette). – whiskeychief Jul 29 at 10:40

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