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He won fifth place in the lottery. It is his 10th already this year.

--> It is his 10th win already this year.

Reasons (of hair loss) can range from the simple&temporary - a vitamin deficiency - to the more complex, like an underlying health condition

--> can range from the simple&temporary ones to the more complex ones

In each case, the first sentence is what I read in the article and the second ones with the bold part are what I feel like they should be written. I feel like both sentences need nouns, so if I'm guessing right(?) they are omitted in the sentence.

But I'm not sure when to omit them and when not to.

Can I just omit them when what it indicates is clear? so it depends on the writer?

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If the subject has been defined (winning or reasons) it does not have to be continually repeated. However sometimes it sounds uncomfortable

It's his 10th win, already this year. sounds better to me

simple ones & temporary ones to the more complex ones is 3 too many ones for my liking

so yes to some extent it depends on the writer

  • If i were to make the first sentence using the participial construction, then does "He won fifth place in the lottery, making it his 10th win already this year." sound better? than a one without win ("He won fifth place in the lottery, making it his 10th already this year.")? – dbwlsld Jul 30 '19 at 3:12
  • And so if the nouns(subjects) are already defined in the sentence, I can omit them if I want to, right? – dbwlsld Jul 30 '19 at 3:13
  • Although win on it's own indicates being first. Has he had 10x lottery wins, or 10x fifth places? – Smock Jul 30 '19 at 8:27

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