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You too shall fall.

This is quote from a character from League of Legends. In this phrase, the positioning of "too" is unusual (but still correct), being the common position at the end:

You shall fall too.

Is there a difference in meaning? I hear the first positioning way less, and mostly in formal situations.

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There could be a subtle difference in meaning, depending on context or, in spoken form, on which words are stressed.

You shall fall too.

When fall is stressed, it suggests that something else is going to happen to you besides falling.

You shall fall too.

When you is stressed, it suggests the original meaning, that someone else is also going to fall.

In written form, which meaning is intended must be inferred from context.

The other order, "you too shall fall," is not ambiguous and always means that someone else is also going to fall. But as you correctly guessed, this order is more antiquated, stiff and formal. So is the word "shall" (except in technical and legal writing) so the original order works well in this situation.

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There is a phrase:

This too shall pass.

Which is actually an idiom, famously popularised by Abraham Lincoln. source

It may sound formal to you purely because it is archaic. This is also why it is used less often.

I don't believe there is any difference in meaning.

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