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I found the following sentence,

If the number differs, the PCI bus orders the packet be re-sent.

Why the sentence above is not

...the PCI bus orders the packet to be re-sent.? or ...the PCI bus orders the packet re-sent.?

Is it possible for the verb 'order' to use the bare infinitive (i.e. 'be', )?

Thank you in advance.

  • Yes, it's possible, but it's just a shortened and stylized alternative to the slightly longer version. It's actually possible to do this with many verbs, not just "order". – Andrew Aug 5 at 3:33
  • Thanks, @Andrew. How I can identify verbs in dictionaries which one I can use a shortened style? – Nori Aug 5 at 3:46
  • I don't think a dictionary will have this information. It might have to be something you learn from reading extensively. In any case it's not necessary, as you can always include the "to". – Andrew Aug 5 at 5:01
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This example simply isn't what you would call perfect English. Perfectly understandable, but the author was probably more worried about the technical meaning than of the grammar. Any of the following would be considered 'more correct':

If the number differs, the PCI bus orders that the packet be re-sent.

If the number differs, the PCI bus orders the packet to be re-sent.

If the number differs, the PCI bus orders a re-sending of the packet.

Remember also, that for technical manuals, the author's first language may not be English, and that they may be more used to speaking than writing - you can be a lot more informal with spoken grammar without anyone picking you up on it.

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