0

What I want to know is if lead or cause can be followed by a that clause?

The shortage of this item will cause/lead that the production cannot be on schedule.

1

You cannot put a that-clause after lead to or cause. For verbs where you can use a that-clause, this is clearly documented in a good dictionary- for example the word think in the Cambridge Dictionary.

You cannot use "cannot be on schedule" in this sentence: you should simply say "not be on schedule". This is grammatically correct but not very elegant. It would be more natural to say "fall behind schedule" or "be delayed" or "run late" or "a delay".

Both lead to and cause can both be followed by a simple object:

The shortage of this item will cause a production delay
The shortage of this item will lead to a production delay

With cause, you just use a simple infinitive for a verb:

The shortage of this item will cause production to fall behind schedule
The shortage of this item will cause production to be delayed
The shortage of this item will cause production to run late

With lead to, you have to use a gerund (-ing):

The shortage of this item will lead to production falling behind schedule
The shortage of this item will lead to production being delayed
The shortage of this item will lead to production running late

| improve this answer | |

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service, privacy policy and cookie policy

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.