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We use on / upon in these sentences:

Don't forget to call me upon reaching there.

The recipe was deliciously awesome that everyone licked their fingers upon finishing it.

upon here means immediately after.

How after is different from upon in this context?

Can I use upon to mean immediately after in any situation?

Thank you.

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Instead of immediately after, you could use when in these sentences, but not with the -ing form. Your sentences (with minor edits):

Don't forget to call me when you get there.

The recipe was so delicious that everyone licked their fingers when they finished it.

Another reasonable option:

Don't forget to call me as soon as you get there.

The recipe was so delicious that everyone licked their fingers as soon as they finished it.

This doesn't sound sound as good in the second sentence, though, because "as soon as" has a nuance of urgency, and licking one's fingers after eating isn't exactly urgent.

  • Could you tell me about the use of "on" in this context. – Kumar sadhu Aug 6 at 15:29
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upon (or on) means: at the time of reaching a place or doing something.

  • Upon reaching the house, we parked the car in the driveway and went indoors.

  • Upon crossing the garden, he saw a rabbit in the bushes.

It is a literary word. People do not use it usually in conversations.

  • Don't forget to call me as soon as you get there. [spoken language, no upon].

  • Upon reaching the house, we forgot all about calling him. [written language]

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