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I am confused about the type of conditionals used in the sentence below

"You'd be stiff, if you'd been sitting on a brick wall all day," said Professor McGonagall.

It's the part of the text from one of the Harry Potter novels.

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The concept of numbered or distinct types of conditional sentences is not one most native speakers learn, and in my view it is not very useful.

Here the conditional is unreal in the sense that the listener presumably has not "been sitting on a brick wall all day", but probably Professor McGonagall has done just that.

Sentences of the form "You would be X if you had Y" are very common, and mean that X naturally follows from Y. Often they also mean "I did Y, and am now X as a result, and if you had done Y also, you would be X just as I am". Here X is "be stiff" and Y is "sit on a brick wall all day".

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  • Thanks for your answer. You write that "The concept of numbered or distinct types of conditional sentences is not one most native speakers learn". Do you know where I can learn about it more? – Артем Малышев Aug 7 '19 at 16:59
  • @Артем I know that it is used in a number of works aimed at people learning English as adults. I suggest googling "type 1 conditional English" as a starting point. – David Siegel Aug 7 '19 at 17:10

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