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I asked a question just now

Consider the initial state $i$ be sunny (non-probabilistic), and the sequence is (sunny, sunny, rainy).

In this particular case, is this first sunny (non-probabilistic) a random variable?

Similarly, consider another scenario, "hot water is good for health", which is a general talking.

Assume there are 2 friends Alice and Bob, Alice is sick (flu, maybe).

When I say "All of my friends believe hot water is good for health", is this particular, specific or concrete?

When I say "Hot water is good for Alice's health", is this particular, specific?

By "general" I mean this piece of experience (may be not right) could apply to anyone, no matter male or female, sick or not sick. By "specific" or "particular", I mean, this piece of experience could apply to a "specific" or "particular" like the one who is being sick.

  • As opposed to what? What do you mean by particular, specific, or concrete in this context? What would the opposite describe? Why would "hot water is good for health" be general as opposed to many things are good? – Jason Bassford Aug 8 '19 at 3:11
  • @JasonBassford By "general" I mean this piece of experience (may be not right) could apply to anyone, no matter male or female, sick or not sick. By "specific" or "particular", I mean, this piece of experience could apply to a "specific" or "particular" like the one who is being sick. – fu DL Aug 8 '19 at 5:57
  • [a general talking?] Generally, we say: a general statement. Better grammar would be: (All my friends believe) hot water is good for the health. Idiomatically, we say good for the health. – Lambie Feb 3 at 21:22
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"hot water is good for health", which is a general talking.

Yes, it is general.

When I say "All of my friends believe hot water is good for health", is this particular, specific or concrete?

This is also general, for the most part. Their belief "hot water is good for health" is certainly general. The fact that you are not referring to a particular friend, but rather "all of my friends" is also general, relatively speaking.

When I say "Hot water is good for Alice's health", is this particular, specific?
By "general" I mean this piece of experience (may be not right) could apply to anyone, no matter male or female, sick or not sick. By "specific" or "particular", I mean, this piece of experience could apply to a "specific" or "particular" like the one who is being sick.

It seems self-evident and obvious, that "Hot water is good for Alice's health" is particular and specific to Alice. It doesn't imply:

"hot water is good for health", which is a general talking.

In this sense, there is little difference between "Hot water is good for Alice's health" and "Bobby wants to go bowling." Both are specific, about one person, and not about everyone.

However, context is important, so we could imagine a situation where "Hot water is good for Alice's health" could tend more towards the general. Imagine a 1950's black and white school film in health class, where Alice is the main character of the film, and she is meant to represent the average student. Whatever applies to Alice should be imagined to apply to everyone. When the announcer says, in an official and pronouncing voice, "Hot water is good for Alice's health", he means for everyone. However, this is a contrived example.

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  • I don't much like: good for heath. Good for the health. Good for one's health. Good for your health. Good for Alice's health. – Lambie Feb 3 at 21:17
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Hot water is good for the health. [general statement]

All my friends believe hot water is good for the health. [also a general statement applied to your friends]

But "Hot water is good for Alice's health". is a general statement applied to a person's health.

All other things being equal, Alice's health is no different from anyone else's health.

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