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Why do need to use "to"? Can it be without to? And how to understand that one or another preposition after a word should be used?

a person's emotional state or the atmosphere of a place as communicated to and felt by others.

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  • It might be better if you present a complete English sentence.
    – user98746
    Aug 8, 2019 at 17:42
  • If you omit to there could be an implied from. Aug 8, 2019 at 17:42
  • @Patriot it's the description of the word "vibe" in Google.
    – Boyep
    Aug 8, 2019 at 17:44
  • 1
    @Boyep No wonder!
    – user98746
    Aug 8, 2019 at 17:46

1 Answer 1

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a person's emotional state or the atmosphere of a place as communicated to and felt by others.

in an interesting sentence fragment. from the comment, I gather that the full sentence would be something like:

"Vibe" means a person's emotional state or the atmosphere of a place as communicated to and felt by others.

If "to" were omitted one would have:

a person's emotional state or the atmosphere of a place as communicated and felt by others.

This would, at least arguably, mean that the state or atmosphere would be communicated by others. That is a significant change in meaning.

One could think of "communicate to" as a phrasal verb, where the object of the verb is the recipient of the communication.

Also, this example is in the passive voice. The subject, the person or thing sending the communication, is not specified. The direct object (emotional state or atmosphere) is in an inverted position, and specified what is being communicated. "to" indicates that the indirect object ("others") is the recipient of the communication. Without 'to" it would be unclear what the role of the indirect object is.

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  • A great answer for English Language and usage. Learners?
    – Brad
    Aug 9, 2019 at 0:27
  • @Brad what do you think is missing, or should be changed? Many answers here use such terms as "subject", "direct object", 'indirect object", "inversion", "phrasal verb" and "passive voice". These are to some extent technical terms, but thy are terms that learners come to know rapidly as they (and other similar terms) are used in many explanations. Aug 9, 2019 at 0:35
  • As I said great answer. But... How I read the question "how to understand that one or another preposition after a word should be used?" seems to be the significant point or at least a significant point, for the writer. I personally appreciate what many of you more experienced/knowledgeable users post. However sometimes I think many answers (my own included) can concentrate on explaining the examples more than answering the questions.
    – Brad
    Aug 9, 2019 at 1:55

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