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If financial situation of citizens is growing, we would call it economic success in the country.

If the population is growing, we call it a demographic success.

What if citizens' freedoms (like freedom of speech, of travelling, of religion, etc.) are growing, how would we describe that success?

(I need an adjective).

EDIT:

Some confusion took place in comments, so, to avoid any further confusion:

  1. Just like in case with economic success and demographic success, I am looking for an adjective that would describe/modify the word “success”;

  2. I need to keep the word “success” – it’s crucial;

  3. Adjectives containing hyphens or spaces are also welcome.

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+200

The requirements of the question are:

  • an adjective that describes “freedom” or “liberty”

  • the word success

This is very difficult.

Not every noun in English has a good adjective form.

Some nouns have good adjectives:

economics — economic (or economical)

ecology — ecological

trees — arboreal

cows — bovine

pigs — porcine

freedom — free

democracy — democratic

But many don’t.

civil liberty — civil-libertarian? Liberational? No.

“Success” might not be the best word to describe this

Success is a word that describes both “pass/fail” concepts and a gradient (continuum).

Democracy, civil liberties and related ideas exist on a continuum.

There is no perfect level of civil liberties or 100% democracy.

You have more flexibility if you use words like “improvement” or “increase”.

Possible answers

These might be close:

😐Maybe: The society’s libertarian success

😐Maybe: The society’s democratic success

😐Maybe: The society’s human rights success

But why not:

🙂Better: The society’s level of human rights success

🙂Better: The society’s increasing human rights success

You can also do a compound noun instead of an adjective plus noun, but this can be quite ugly:

😕 Use with caution:

  • the society’s civil liberties success;
  • the society’s democracy success;
  • the society’s ballot access success

This kind of writing feels very technical. English is open to compound nouns but this can sound very strange.

Or just say what you mean:

I’d recommend you give up on”xxx success” and rephrase.

🤩Best: The society’s recent improvement in civil liberties, access to the ballot box, a free press, freedom of worship, and economic opportunity...

Or just as good:

🤩Best: The society’s success at improving human rights and democratic conditions

Or whatever.

Bottom line: you may not be able to force the sentence to say “xxx success”, since not every concept can be expressed that way.

| improve this answer | |
  • "Success is a word that describes both “pass/fail” concepts and a gradient (continuum)" - Can you, please, elaborate here? I don't quiet understand the point being made. (An example of "success" as a pass as opposed to and example of "success" as continuum might help me here). – brilliant Aug 18 '19 at 11:43
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    Your question states "If the population is growing, we call it a demographic success." I don't think this premise is true. It's not clear from your question why you are insisting the answer must have the word "success". Political scientists generally don't use the word success in describing a society's civil liberties, because they recognize a range of conditions, for example in restrictions on the press -- even in "open" societies -- for which there is no perfect exemplar that exists, nor a consensus on what "success" consists of. – whiskeychief Aug 18 '19 at 18:03
  • I understand that. But can you, please, explain or give an example of how the word "success" can describe a continuum - that was the point that I didn't understand. Webster gives two definitions for "continuum": merriam-webster.com/dictionary/continuum . Which one do you mean, the first one or the second one? – brilliant Aug 19 '19 at 3:11
  • The first one, with the example "a continuum of temperatures ranging from very cold to very hot". – whiskeychief Aug 19 '19 at 10:25
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An increase in peoples Civic Freedoms and/or Liberties.

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  • Thanks, but that's not what I need. I need an adjective. Precisely, an adjective that would go along with the word "success". – brilliant Aug 12 '19 at 13:26
  • emancipation (noun) - freeing someone from the control of another. Although with the increasing instability associated with "populism" (and sometimes ill-informed voters / protesters), not every social commentator would necessarily enthuse over the "successful" democratization / Westernization of the world. – FumbleFingers Reinstate Monica Aug 12 '19 at 13:54
  • A "Sociological Success" ? – rkchl Aug 12 '19 at 14:29
  • @brilliant The word increase fits without a problem. The adjectival form of increase is increasing. So: increasing success. – Jason Bassford Aug 12 '19 at 20:37
  • @JasonBassford - AFAIK, the word increasing does not contain any civic-freedom connotation. – brilliant Aug 12 '19 at 23:02
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Social-liberty-success

Or

Societal-autonomy-success

Or

Liberal-life-success

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Fully agreed to WhiskeyChief but I see that the answer still does not satisfy you so I'm forced to come up with something that is not usual.

You are searching for a five-legged elephant. As FumbleFingers suggested, you need a different verb to express the success of 'so-called' growth in freedom.

Forcefully, you may opt for liberty rather than freedom in this case. Since you are stuck to the word success at any cost, it could be...

A nation's liberation success depends on ...

| improve this answer | |
  • Thanks for the effort done within the requirements stated in the question. Can you, please, tell me: would such phrase as "nation's liberation success" first cause a native speaker think of a freedom that one nation gets (say, as a result of an independence war, in which the nation stops being a part of another nation) or of a freedom (like human-rights freedom) that citizens pertaining to one nation enjoy within it? – brilliant Aug 20 '19 at 8:55
  • It depends on the context. If you write A nation's liberation success depends on the Human Development Index then it relates to the 'happiness' of the citizen and quality of their lives. But, by large, liberty would come with human rights freedoms as stated in the question, IMO. – Maulik V Aug 20 '19 at 10:03
  • I have yet to see an answer in the form of “xxx success” that would not earn a mark in red pen from my high school English teachers as being “awkward— rephrase.” The question is overly restrictive to be able to provide an acceptable answer. – whiskeychief Aug 20 '19 at 11:30
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If financial situation of citizens is growing, we would call it economic success in the country. If the population is growing, we call it a demographic success. What if citizens' freedoms (like freedom of speech, of travelling, of religion, etc.) are growing, how would we describe that success?

Enhanced Civic Entitlements or Enhanced Civic Liberties

Try this "In our lifetime, Our Nation has seen a Prosperous Economy, Demographic Success and the People's Civic Liberties Enhanced"

enhanced; adjective: Cambridge English Dictionary better than before: greater in value than before:

We continue to create new and enhanced versions of our products.

The measures to encourage investment include enhanced capital allowances.

civic: adjective: before noun); Cambridge English Dictionary of a town or city or the people who live in it:

entitlement; noun Cambridge English Dictionary LAW, HR a situation in which you have the right to do or have something:

liberty noun (Freedom) Cambridge English Dictionary :formal the freedom to live as you wish or go where you want:

| improve this answer | |
  • I realise I can write "In our lifetime, Our Nation has seen a Prosperous Economy, Demographic Success and Civic Liberties Enhanced" and it would have the same meaning I have included "the people's" for clarity. As political statements often do. – Brad Aug 20 '19 at 13:29

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