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What do you call a place including an office or a room where an artist (e.g. a photographer or a painter) works? I know the word "atelier" which based on Cambridge Dictionary's definition is something literary or based on MacMillan Dictionary a formal word.

However, I need a word which doesn't sound literary or fancy and totally weird in everyday speech to talk about such a place. I wonder what word works properly in this sense if "atelier" doesn't?

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A studio is a working space for an artist.

  1. a: the working place of a painter, sculptor, or photographer

    b: a place for the study of an art (such as dancing, singing, or acting)

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    I have a larger vocabulary than most of the people I associate with, and I still had to look up atelier. Almost anyone will understand studio; I suspect that even many of those who do know what atelier means will form a negative opinion of the person who actually uses the word (the politest opinion likely being "stuck-up"). – Jeff Zeitlin Aug 13 at 13:09
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    @A-friend There's nothing wrong with atelier. Except that you, yourself, ruled it out in the question, saying it's literary and that you were looking for something else. – Jason Bassford Supports Monica Aug 13 at 14:55
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    I'm from the US and have literally never encountered the word atelier outside of the video game series. Seems it's a French word that's sometimes used in English, but certainly not in my area. – Hearth Aug 14 at 1:16
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    Actually "atelier" is simply the French word for the space. Using French words, especially for artistic things, can sound more refined. – Andrew Aug 14 at 1:53
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    "Atelier" is used as a professional term in English, but it usually means a group of artists or students working together under the leadership of one person, and usually working as a commercial organisation, for example producing jewellery or fashion. It is not the right word to refer to an individual artist working alone. – alephzero Aug 14 at 11:28

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