1

Someone meant to say: "She's a lot like her, though she doesn't look like her, but the way she thinks".

So can it be put this way:

She's a lot like her, not in looks, but in the way she thinks.

She's a lot like her, not with her looks, but in the way she thinks.

She's a lot like her, not by her looks, but in the way she thinks.

So what should be used "in looks", "with her looks" or "by her looks"?

Actually I made these up myself, so I was just wondering if they sounds natural.....

2

Well, your first and third examples pass muster for me as grammatical and reasonably natural, especially the simpler first one. You could also say "not in how she looks" or "not so much to look at but..." or "not to look at but..." (and many others) etc.

There are a lot of ways to express this idea, especially around the secondary idea of "thinking like"-- you might actually mean "thinks like", as in has similar thought processes, but you could also describe this in terms of personality, or temperament, or communication style.

5
  • So what will be better "in looks" or "in how she looks"? – It's about English Aug 13 '19 at 17:03
  • Is "in looks" be likely to be used by a native? – It's about English Aug 13 '19 at 17:03
  • @It'saboutEnglish Tricky. I would say it in speech with a certain inflection, but that rhythm is hard to capture in text so I would probably not write it quite like that. I would be more likely to write something like "She's a lot like [her], in personality if not in appearance". – Ben Zotto Aug 13 '19 at 17:17
  • No I meant while talking, will "in looks" be more common or "in how she looks"? – It's about English Aug 13 '19 at 17:44
  • 1
    So in speech will it be okay and natural to use "in looks"? – It's about English Aug 13 '19 at 18:17

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