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  1. This bridge is so built that it can be open in the middle.
  2. This bridge is built so that it can be open in the middle.

I wonder which one is correct English and what is the difference in meaning. I think they're all correct English and the meaning of each sentence is below.

  1. This bridge is built in the manner that it can be open in the middle.
  2. This bridge is built for the purpose that it can be open in the middle.

I want to know whether my thinking is right.

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  • In #1 "so built" would refer to what was previously stated, for example "The bridge has a tower at each end." – Weather Vane Aug 13 '19 at 18:44
  • @WeatherVane But, there's some native speakers who insist that sentence 1 is wrong. You agree with them? – GKK Aug 13 '19 at 18:46
  • It's not wrong, but is unusual without a preceding clause as suggested. What is wrong, is that each sentence should probably say "...be opened..." Sentence #2 is the best. – Weather Vane Aug 13 '19 at 18:47
  • @WeatherVane thank you for pointing out the error. I'll edit my post. – GKK Aug 13 '19 at 18:50
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    I disagree, sorry. Here the "so built" means "built like this", or "thus built". – Weather Vane Aug 13 '19 at 19:03
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** I think they're all correct English, I want to know whether my thinking is right?**

Well I know you will all mark me down for this answer but!!! First tidy up the English!

How can we be debating this question. How can we have a bridge is so built that it can be open in the middle. The word has to be Opened or in the middle has to be deleted. Which leaves us with

This bridge is so(in this way) built that it can be opened in the middle.

This bridge is built so(in this way) that it can be opened in the middle.

or

This bridge is (in this way) so built that it can open

This bridge is built so(in this way) that it can open

so adverb Cambridge English Dictionary(IN THIS WAY) in this way, or like this:

Example The pillars, which are outside the building, are so placed in order to provide the maximum space inside

adverb; noun; Cambridge English Dictionary a word that describes or gives more information about a verb, adjective, adverb, or phrase:

Adverbs: position; We can put adverbs and adverb phrases at the front, in the middle or at the end of a clause Cambridge English Dictionary

Now we can see that the debate is not necessary as the adverb can be placed anywhere as long as we tidy up (Tense, word order etc.) the phrase that surrounds it.

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