2

Maintain a faster walking speed than is natural for you.

(This sentence is quoted from the book "Thinking, fast and slow", p. 22., by Daniel Kahneman.)

  • Is what is omitted in "than (what) is natural for you."?

  • Is this kind of omission common in English?

  • 2
    Hello, Jin, notice that you have duplicated the verb "is" in your first question. The second "is" is not necessary. – RubioRic Aug 14 '19 at 6:41
  • Hello Rubio. I got your point but this is the quoted sentence from the book I mentioned above. I changed nothing in this sentence. – Jin Aug 14 '19 at 7:17
  • 2
    "Is what is omitted in "than (what) is natural for you."?" should be "Is what omitted in "than (what) is natural for you."?" Notice that I have removed the second "is" – RubioRic Aug 14 '19 at 7:26
  • Oh I got it. Thanks. And I'm sorry I misunderstood. – Jin Aug 14 '19 at 9:19
3

It is normal to omit words from a sentence, and not change its meaning.
The general term for this is ellipsis, which has two definitions:

  • A series of three dots indicating words deliberately omitted from a quotation.

  • The omission of words that are understood and thus unnecessary.

The second definition applies here, and the full sentence can be

Maintain a faster walking speed than what is natural for you.

Maintain a faster walking speed than the speed that is natural for you.

It is common to omit words from a sentence and still retain its meaning.

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service, privacy policy and cookie policy

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.