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Is it grammatically correct to use comma in this manner :

"You will get a product that is nice and clean, ready for further processing" ?

My colleague said it is wrong. Is it true?

  • What is an "XX", please use the actual word and don't replace it with XX. – James K Aug 14 '19 at 9:12
  • it could be result, outcome or product. – Eric0x Aug 14 '19 at 9:16
  • Which one? What did you actually say to your colleague? The actual words that you used. – James K Aug 14 '19 at 9:19
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It would be okay in speech, but not in writing.

You mean the item will be "nice and clean" and also it will be "ready for processing", there is a list of two items, so we normally would link these with "and". However, in this case, that would look odd because the first item in the list already has "and".

This is a situation in which an "Oxford comma" could be useful:

You will get a product that is nice and clean, and ready for further processing.

However, do you really need to say "nice"? It is a "weak modifier" it doesn't add much information to the sentence. It's not really possible for it to be "clean but not nice". So drop the word "nice". Then the Oxford comma is not needed.

You will get a product that is clean and ready for further processing.

Alternatively: "You will get a nice and clean product that is ready for further processing."

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  • Thanks! u are awesome! – Eric0x Aug 14 '19 at 9:21
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    Alternatively, You will get a nice and clean product that is ready for further processing. (Is this a situation where a compound adjective can be hyphenated to nice-and-clean?) – Smock Aug 14 '19 at 10:15
  • That is a good suggestion, and it demonstrates how using the actual words in the question instead of "XX" can help find effective alternate solutions. – James K Aug 14 '19 at 10:34
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    How would you ask for "fish and chips, and a pie and chips" (The answer is not "Fish, chips, a pie and chips"). You are taking a rule far too literally. "Nice and clean" forms a single item, much like "fish and chips". However please write your own answer. – James K Aug 14 '19 at 11:38
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    @James K sorry the wife's changed her mind. Half a Cod and Chips on a tray, no salt and vinegar. A portion of chips, a pastie, plenty of salt but easy on the vinegar. A large curry sauce a small carton of mushy peas and some batter bits, if you have any. – Brad Aug 14 '19 at 14:05
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"You will get a product that is nice and clean, ready for further processing" Is it grammatically correct to use comma in this manner?

It would be acceptable in speech, but not in writing.

You have two phrases "nice and clean" and "ready for processing", this is a list of two items, so we normally would link these with "and" as I have shown above. However, that would sound wrong because we have already used "and". There is a rule, Apart from two-word conjunctions, we only use one conjunction to connect words or phrases. That is, One "And" in a sentence (although it is often broken, especially in spoken English). Cambridge English Dictionary

This is a situation in which a "comma" could be useful, to replace the first "and" but better still would be to rephrase the sentence to use only one "and" or even omit the use of "and" altogether.

"You will get a clean, high quality product that is ready for further processing."

Note I have removed the word nice as it adds nothing to this sentence. I presume you are trying to emphasis it is a good product. In this case high quality would be more descriptive.

Conjunctions Cambridge English Dictionary

Conjunctions are linking words like and, or, but, then and because:

Warning: Apart from two-word conjunctions, we only use one conjunction to connect words or phrases:

Because my alarm didn’t go off, I was late for work. Not: Because my alarm didn’t go off, so I was late for work.

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