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Edited:

Please imagine two close friends have taken a trip to another country. One of them is familiar with the local culture and the other one is not. Now, let's say showing a location with finger is considered as rude there. How shall the aware person let the unaware one know about it in a natural way?

  1. Here, it's rude to point something with finger.
  2. Here, it's rude to point something out with finger.
  3. Here, it's rude to point at something with finger.
  • Don't point! is something parents say to their children. An adult aggressively "squaring up" to another adult showing such disrespect (thoughtlessly, deliberately, whatever) probably wouldn't want to use such explicitly "child-centric" language - unless it was expressed in a somewhat roundabout way, such as Who're you pointing the finger at? [If you've got something to say about me, say it to my face]. Your question is thus more about how people react to perceived social indiscretions in specific contexts (POB), rather than potentially useful analysis of preposition/article usage. – FumbleFingers Reinstate Monica Aug 14 '19 at 13:49
  • (And I'm sure your English is already good enough to know you need a determiner - such as your - before finger in such contexts.) – FumbleFingers Reinstate Monica Aug 14 '19 at 13:51
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    "It's rude to point" is perfectly valid, the finer part is implied. Similarly, "It's rude to stare" (with your eyes is implied). – Bee Aug 14 '19 at 15:03
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    No that is something slightly different. Point is the action of pointing with your finger, point out is when you notice something and mention it out loud, this may be accompanied by a pointed finger, but not nessisarily – Bee Aug 15 '19 at 7:30
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    Ah so that actually is valid but only if he says "look, there's a horse over there" it's just about saying it – Bee Aug 15 '19 at 8:00
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To summarise the comments by myself and @FumbleFingers:

Don't point! - An adult aggressively "squaring up" to another adult showing such disrespect probably wouldn't want to use this language since it's considered something one would say to a child i.e. "child-centric" language.

An exception would be if it was expressed in a roundabout way, such as

Who're you pointing the finger at? -Who are you blaming for this (as opposed to physically pointing)

"It's rude to point" and It's rude to point at something with your finger.

Both mean the same thing and are perfectly valid, the finger part is implied. Similarly, "It's rude to stare" (with your eyes is implied). As Fumble mentioned, you do need that "at/to" if you are going to include the something.

It's rude to point something out.

This option has a slightly difference meaning. Point is the action of pointing with your finger. Point out is when you notice something and mention it out loud, this may be accompanied by a pointed finger, but not necessarily.

He pointed out the house from a far just means he said:

Hey, look there is a house up head.

He may or may not also point to it, but the phrase means drawing your attention towards the thing, rather than literally pointing at it. I couldn't find any good definitions of this, but I hope it makes sense!

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