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The stock starts up again, and it has a rise of six or seven points in one day, followed the next day by perhaps eight to ten points—with great activity—but during the last hour of the day all of a sudden it has an abnormal break of seven or eight points.

Here, the "starts" is in present tense, but "followed" is in past tense, why?

I think "the next day" is "the tomorrow", so at least it could be in future tense.

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If you look closely, it is not a past tense but a past participle, acting like an adjective.

If you break these sentences down, you get

The stock starts up again.

It has a rise of six or seven points in one day.

It is followed the next day by perhaps eight to ten points—with great activity—but during the last hour of the day all of a sudden it has an abnormal break of seven or eight points.

I guess this paragraph is an answer to a test question where you describe a given line chart, otherwise I'd use the past tense for all of those verbs.

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followed is not past tense, here. It's the past participle, introducing an adjectival phrase, like

  • We saw a house painted red
  • Every man remembers a love regretted.
  • Meals eaten quickly lead to poor digestion.

The phrases painted red, regretted, and eaten quickly each function as adjectives, modifying the noun in front of them.

The complete phrase here is (sort of) "seven points followed by eight to ten points", with various prepositional phrases inserted as needed.

The past participle is often the spelled the same way as the simple past tense, but not always. Eaten instead of ate.

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  • "Points followed", I was thinking "one day is followed" when people say it's a passive tense. Haha :)
    – Zhang
    Aug 16 '19 at 3:27

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