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Might there be a context in which "He walked out on me" is meant for "He walked out to me", not "He walked out from me" ?

For example,

While I was preparing for my daughter's birthday party, my husband was doing his work in his room, and after he was done with it, he walked out on me to help me.

(I made this sentence)

I know "walk out on someone" usually means "leave someone", but I think that could mean different according to context, as shown above.

If my thinking about "walk out on" is right, can these expressions mean different according to context?

  1. Rush out on
  2. Run out on
  3. Go out on
  4. Move out on
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I've never known "to walk out on" to mean anything but to leave. Your example does not make sense. It says "... he left me [in order] to help me". The sentence should read

While I was preparing for my daughter's birthday party, my husband was doing his work in his room, and after he was done with it, he walked [came] out to help me.

  • If "walked out upon/onto" is used instead, would that sentence mean clear? – SinK Aug 16 at 10:56
  • If you say "... he walked out upon me..." it still means he left you. If you say "... he walked out onto me ..." it's even worse! You are saying he physically walked onto your body, presumably whilst you were lying on the floor. – Peter Jennings Aug 16 at 11:02
  • However, this sentence "‎He went out on the balcony" doesn't mean "He left the balcony". So, I don't understand why "walk out on" cannot be used to express approaching someone. – SinK Aug 16 at 11:10
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    In this case it is a shortened form of "_ He walked out onto the balcony_" and there is no suggestion that he is leaving it. I do however agree that this is an exception to what I said in my answer, but onto is a better way of saying it. – Peter Jennings Aug 16 at 12:06
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    @SinK - "Walk out on" works, but, as Peter just said, it emphasizes what you are stepping onto, not who or what you are going toward. So, we can say any of these: he walked out on the ledge, he walked out on the pier, we ran out on the field, they tiptoed out on the tightrope, etc. Also worth noting: we don't need to include the "out" in any of those, although it does emphasize that the subject is venturing somewhere, as opposed to going there incidentally. I can say, "Bob walked on the street," or, "Bob walked out on the street," but the latter emphasizes how Bob is leaving the sidewalk. – J.R. Aug 16 at 14:05
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The example sentence does not sound correct.

While I was preparing for my daughter's birthday party, my husband was doing his work in his room, and after he was done with it, he walked out on me to help me.

You are right that "walk out on someone" means a negative action that can hurt someone:

to abandon -- Farlex, The Free Dictionary

or

to leave without finishing something -- Cambridge Dictionary

It does not work with the idea that he helped me.

To fix the example

To make sense, the example would need to be changed to something like:

✔️ After he was done with his work, he walked out of his workshop to help me.

😐 After he was done, he walked out of his room to help me.

This is fine grammatically — but it sounds a little strange. (You are using extra words to describe the walking.) Is this a castle that takes extra effort to walk around in?

It’s better to just get right to the point:

✔️ After he was done, he came over to help me.

You can walk out of doors

So walking out on someone or something is usually understood to mean “abandonment.”

You can, however, walk out on the porch, walk out on a deck, walk out on the patio, or walk out on a balcony.

Here, the word out is understood to mean “going from inside to outside“, or from “indoors to outdoors“.

walking in on someone

There’s a different phrase, “walking in on someone” or “walking in on something,” which is totally different.

There are a lot of different propositions that can be used with the word “walk“: walk by, walk-through, walk out on, walk in on, etc.

The Cambridge Dictionary has a good definition of choices.

  • Comments are not for extended conversation; therefore, the previous discussion has been moved to chat. – J.R. Aug 16 at 13:56
  • I don't think there is anything wrong with, "After he was done, he came out of his room to help me." – J.R. Aug 16 at 14:09

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