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...The construction with "of" seems to be the most common, followed by the one with no preposition, and then by the ones with "in" and "at" .

The funeral is at 3.00, followed by a reception at X bar.

What is the function of "followed by" in those sentences above? Is it a participle? DOes it act as an adverb or noun?

Does it modify the whole main clause? or just the subject of the main clause, "the construction" and "the funeral" ?

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It's a reduced relative clause: The funeral is at 3.00, (which will be) followed by a reception at X bar.

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  • Thank you. Can I rewrite them like this as well: a- "The funeral is at 3.00, which is followed by a reception at X bar." b- ".The construction with "of" seems to be the most common, which is followed by the one with no preposition, and then by the ones with "in" and "at" . Commented Aug 17, 2019 at 10:40
  • + In these sentences, do reduced relative clauses modify the whole main clause? or just the subject of the main clause, "the construction" and "the funeral" ? Commented Aug 17, 2019 at 10:42
  • It depends—as is the case with relative clauses, sometimes they modify only the subject, sometimes the whole clause. But I strongly advise you against rewriting—English is the language of contractions and ellipses, the shorter, the better. Commented Aug 17, 2019 at 10:58
  • If this is indeed a 'reduced' relative clause, which I would dispute, it doesn't modify anything. Non-defining relative clauses, reduced or otherwise, are not modifiers; rather, they have a semantic 'anchor' that they refer to. In this case the anchor would be "the funeral is at 3.00". I would call the clause a supplementary adjunct, a loosely attached expression presenting supplementary, non-integrated content.
    – BillJ
    Commented Aug 17, 2019 at 11:43
  • @BillJ I agree that maybe modify might not be the best term here. But English linguistics terminolgy is so complicated and vague, so... On the other hand, it is indeed a reduced relative clause, imo, since we cannot drop the main part\anchor. At least, my example: "The funeral is at 3.00, which will be followed by a reception at X bar" contains an unequivocal relative, refering to the whole of the previous clause. Commented Aug 17, 2019 at 12:10

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