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Is the following sentence semantically correct

The man cut the tree into thin strips.

How can a tree be cut into thin strips?

Its stem can be cut into thin strips.

  • I think you mean "trunk" instead of "stem". If you agree that the "trunk" of the tree can be cut into thin strips, I think you understand the meaning of the sentence. I would not think that the tree's small branches or leaves are part of the sentence. – whiskeychief Sep 1 at 18:24
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I agree that it's difficult to imagine a whole tree being cut into strips, and it's much easier to imagine the trunk being cut into thin strips. Because this is so obvious, I think the writer is trusting that the reader will understand that only the trunk can be cut into strips, so they don't bother to clarify that they're just talking about the trunk.

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Is the following sentence semantically correct The man cut the tree into thin strips. How can a tree be cut into thin strips?

Yes of course a tree can be cut into thin strips. Why do you think it cannot? Not only the trunk (stem is the wrong word) but the branches can be cut into planks or even thinner strips. Of course if you only think of Fir trees it would be difficult but the branches on some of the giant tree are huge.Picture

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