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I’ve been waiting for more than an hour for him.
I’ve been waiting more than for an hour for him.
Which is correct?

  • Neither are correct, because you have to use have been waiting, not ...waited. There's nothing wrong with optionally omitting the preposition before more than an hour regardless of whether it comes before or after the other preposition-based adverbial clause: I've been waiting [for] more than an hour for him. But you can't omit the "primary" preposition before the indirect object (for him). – FumbleFingers Aug 18 at 13:39
  • Thanks. I’ve been waiting for more than an hour for him. I’ve been waiting more than for an hour for him. I’ve been waiting more than an hour for him. Are they correct? “For him” must be the last words right? – Yamacure Aug 18 at 14:55
  • No. I said regardless of whether it (for more than an hour) comes before or after the other preposition-based adverbial clause (for him) above. There's nothing wrong with I've been waiting for him [for] over an hour - the only thing that's "fixed" is you must include the preposition before the indirect object (as also pointed out in the top answer to the linked question). But it's optional before over an hour. – FumbleFingers Aug 18 at 15:45
  • Sorry for my mistakes. I must include the preposition before the indirect object, so I can’t say “I’ve been waiting him for more than an hour, can I? I have another question. For over an hour, Over an hour, For more than an hour, More than an hour, are they all used as the same meaning? – Yamacure Aug 18 at 16:00

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