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1- If he carries on driving like that, he'll end up dead. (Source)

2- The last time he was in the room with a serial killer, he ended up chained to a hospital bed.

(It is from a tv-series. He was in a room with a serial killer as a result he had a panic attack then in the hospital they chained him to a bed because he was still having some episodes after the incident.)

Is using "being" before the adjective/past participle here optional?

1a- If he carries on driving like that, he'll end up being dead.

2a- The last time he was in the room with a serial killer, he ended up being chained to a hospital bed

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  • end up dead is fine. No, being is not needed and is not really grammatical here.

  • end up + adjective (dead, alive, rich, poor, sick, ill, crazy, etc;.) Those are adjectives that describe a person's state or condition.

Please note the verbal phrases:
- end up being a nice person = verbal phrase
- end up getting rich [idiom]
- end up getting home [get home, idiom with get: get here, get there, get to school]
- end up understanding the plot
- end up dropping out of school

When there is a verbal phrase, you need an ing. If it is simply an adjective that works for end up, you do not.

  • But I just saw a sentence that uses "being" before "past participle" . That is why created this issue. "That a person must handle the unbroken (drinking) glasses on display with care because otherwise they may end up being broken. "(ell.stackexchange.com/questions/187869/…) . Even in sentence 2, is "being" unnecessary? – Talha Özden Aug 19 at 17:25
  • being broken [by someone] is a passive form. "being dead" in your sample sentence is not. The glasses are being broken by the boys in the cafeteria. That use of being broken has zero to do with end up. – Lambie Aug 19 at 20:25

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