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I'm trying to give an example for muting an Alert on a technical guide:

An Alert should communicate clearly and as soon as its conditions meet.

However, some circumstances may lead to generating unnecessary noise on your notification channels like, e.g., scheduled maintenance.

I'm not sure if it is correct to use both interruptions, I've searched the terms and it doesn't seem to come together, for example here it just compares them -> https://iconlogic.blogs.com/weblog/2010/11/grammar-workshop-ie-versus-eg-and-such-as-versus-like.html

But, it says that "e.g.= for example" and "like introduces a model, but not the exact example". So in my sentence, I would be doing the same as:

However, some circumstances may lead to generating unnecessary noise on your notification channels (like) introducing, (e.g.) for example, scheduled maintenance.

Is it incorrect?

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    You should not use both e.g. and for example at the same time. That's redundant. In the example sentence, it's essentially no different than writing for example (for example). The same is mostly true of (like) introducing. Although those two words aren't nearly as similar in meaning, it is still bizarre to see them next to each other that way. (The equivalent of like is such as, not introducing.) – Jason Bassford Supports Monica Aug 23 at 11:12
  • I suggest "However, some circumstances may lead to generating unnecessary noise on your notification channels, for example during scheduled maintenance." – Weather Vane Aug 23 at 12:02
  • @JasonBassford: I can't really see that. There are many context in which like is exactly synonymous with and replaceable by [such] as, and obviously e.g. can always be replaced by for example. Given that there are many written instances of the sequence as, for example in Google Books, it's not obvious to me we can single out OP's specific sequence and context as "incorrect". Maybe it's just not universally considered idiomatic. – FumbleFingers Reinstate Monica Aug 23 at 12:05
  • @FumbleFingers Are you sure you didn't misread my comment? You're essentially saying what I did. – Jason Bassford Supports Monica Aug 23 at 12:16
  • @JasonBassford: You're right - I didn't fully digest your comment. Yeah - we both seem to be saying / implying that most native speakers tend to avoid this specific form, so it's definitely "non-idiomatic" for most of us. I'm not quite convinced this is because it's "tautologous", but I wouldn't argue against that line (I have no alternative line of reasoning, that's for sure! :) – FumbleFingers Reinstate Monica Aug 23 at 12:47
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Yes, using "like, e.g." is incorrect.

In general English these expressions, among others, can be used interchangeably.

Also, meet would be better written in the passive voice.

An Alert should communicate clearly and as soon as its conditions are met.

Here you want to describe an example item or a non-exhaustive list, hence the use of example(s) in the sentence.

  • However, some circumstances may lead to generating unnecessary noise on your notification channels, like scheduled maintenance.
  • However, some circumstances may lead to generating unnecessary noise on your notification channels, such as scheduled maintenance.
  • However, some circumstances may lead to generating unnecessary noise on your notification channels, e.g. scheduled maintenance.
  • However, some circumstances may lead to generating unnecessary noise on your notification channels, for example scheduled maintenance.

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