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  1. Mayor Steven Smith attended a charity event.
  2. Wildlife Liaison Officer, Lorraine Nelson, attended the scene of the incident.

These examples were taken from a newspaper.

How does the appositive, in this case an occupation "Mayor", differ from "Wildlife Liaison Officer" in terms of it taking commas? They are both similar in that they are both occupations and not specific identifiers?

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One should not separate a title from a name with a comma. The newspaper that did so was in error.


Where a comma would be used is when a name is preceded by a noun clause, like this:

The officer who responded, Sergeant Smith, stated ...

A police officer responded to the call. That officer, Sergeant Smith, ...

This is called apposition. The writer of the erroneous article may simply have gotten confused about the structure of the sentence.

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1.Mayor Steven Smith attended a charity event.

2.Wildlife Liason Officer, Lorraine Nelson, attended the scene of the incident.

These examples were taken from a newspaper.

How does the appositive, in this case an occupation, Mayor differ from Wildlife Liaison Officer, in terms of it taking commas? They are both similar in that they are both occupations and not specific identifiers?


Sorry you are incorrect.

Mayor is a title Therefore it is a specific identifier.

Therefore there is no comma between Mayor and his name it is one phrase. The continuing sentence is also short and joins perfectly with the name to make a complete sentence without several phrases. The second example would be awkward without the commas as it is listing three item. Occupation, name, reason.

answers.comThe Mayor of a city would be addressed as Honorable (full name), Mayor of (name of town). Any elected official is addressed as Honorable, and they may retain the title for life.

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    Your incorrect? Also, your remarks about mayors are wrong for my country. – Michael Harvey Aug 25 at 16:59
  • @Michael Harvey Thank you for the comment. You would be amazed how many people mark you down or whatever and do not comment even on your typos. Mayor is listed as a title in the UK or should I say England as I think Scotland does not use that title en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Title and the above link in the question references the U.S. If I have erred in my research my apologise. – Brad Aug 26 at 2:07
  • @Michael Harvey The correct term of address for UK and commonwealth Mayors is Your Worship except in specific locations where it is Right Worshipful, according to en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Worship_(style) – Brad Aug 26 at 2:24

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