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If a person is supposed to come but not showing up for the last two days, then which sentence is grammatically correct:

He has not been coming for the last two days.

or

He is not coming for the last two days.

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He has not been coming for the last two days is correct because we do not use the present continuous with a time phrase like for the last two days so he is not coming for the last two days is wrong

You can say:

He has not come for the last two days

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  • What you mean is correct, but "you may preferably say" isn't really idiomatic (even after correcting the spelling! :) I'm assuming (perhaps mistakenly) that what you're trying to imply includes both You may prefer to say... (you may prefer this alternative as a stylistic choice) and the preferred form is... (other native speakers usually prefer this alternative). Aug 29, 2019 at 12:36
  • @FumbleFingers I will correct it Aug 29, 2019 at 12:38
  • Offhand I can't think of an elegant way to combine both those senses. You may prefer to use the preferred form... doesn't really cut it! Aug 29, 2019 at 12:40

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