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I was googling but I couldn't find any answers:

What is the precise meaning of the words 'it is', when they are used in a way

  • Are we going to the cinema on Friday or Saturday?
  • I don't have any time on Friday.
  • OK, then Saturday it is.
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    - OK, then Saturday it is. : Ok, We''ll make it [the day we're going to go] Saturday. N it is (with N usually a noun string, possibly plural) is used in spoken English to confirm the choice / correctness of N. 'Saturday it is, then.' 'I've asked three maths teachers, and they all get the answer to be 42. 42 it is, then.' 'The only people who can host the party are Dan and Mina. So Dan and Mina it is.' Commented Apr 27, 2014 at 10:47
  • A bit off the topic but nevertheless: math teachers should not be trusted when they are saying that 42 is the answer.
    – Anoda
    Commented Apr 27, 2014 at 10:58
  • I told you that you wouldn't like it. Commented Apr 27, 2014 at 11:02
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    I would humbly submit that the meaning is perfectly transparent from the context. It is self-explanatory.
    – ЯegDwight
    Commented Apr 27, 2014 at 11:04
  • Unlike, perhaps, the meaning of “it is” at the end of Universe Commented Apr 27, 2014 at 11:10

2 Answers 2

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OK, then @Edwin's comment it is. : Ok, We'll make it [the answer we're going to post] Edwin's comment.

N it is (with N usually a noun string, possibly plural) is used in spoken English to confirm the choice / correctness of N.

'Edwin's comment it is, then.'
'I've asked three maths teachers, and they all get the answer to be 42. 42 it is, then.'
'The only people who can host the party are Dan and Mina. So Dan and Mina it is.'


There's not really much more to say about this idiomatic usage. As Edwins says, what seems to be the referent of it can be plural, but arguably it's more like the dummy/existential "it". It's worth noting this ELU answer, and considering this possible conversation (and the first word of this current sentence! :)...

'I was at that cosmology lecture, but I don't know whether to believe the little old lady or the scientists'
'C'mon, man! That little old lady is my grandmother! I can assure you she would never lie!'
'Okay, you've convinced me. Turtles all the way down it is'

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  • +1 for 'turtles all the way down'. In fact, +1 for any answer with turtles. ... I wonder, though, if there isn't one more thing to say: that the attractiveness of this idiom lies in its permitting a strong natural emphasis on is. Commented Apr 27, 2014 at 13:53
  • Those particular turtles are getting to be even more popular than the Teenage Mutant Ninja ones (or maybe it's just "red car syndrome"). Only yesterday I was reading Lawrence M. Krauss's excellent book A Universe from Nothing. (I knew it was going to be an excellent book as soon as he mentioned the turtles in his preface! :) Commented Apr 27, 2014 at 14:27
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While not disagreeing with @Edwin's comment about it being the choice, I'd want to highlight that it's normally/typically seen where there were a number of possible answers to the question, then some have been excluded until a single choice remains and the phrase is summarising the result.

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