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Being notoriously picky with my choice of words, I have come to a realization that by attaching the -ing suffix to a verb i.e. compare reduces the clarity. Whereas using "compares" is far more precise.

For example,

  1. The author's diction "quote" metaphorically compares the world around us, positioning the reader to...

  2. The author's diction "quote", metaphorically comparing the world around us, positioning the reader to...

Why is it that it sounds more precise and stronger when attaching "es" to a verb rather than "ing"

  • Why is it that it sounds more precise and stronger when attaching "es" to a verb rather than "ing" It doesn't. Also, your first example sentence is ungrammatical. – Kreiri Sep 3 '19 at 12:54
  • How so? English is not my first language. Edit: was it notorious i.e. should have been notoriously – R.Su Sep 3 '19 at 12:56
  • Your second example is not a full sentence, but just noun phrase. – BillJ Sep 3 '19 at 13:16
  • You had a comma between subject and its verb before the edit. – Kreiri Sep 3 '19 at 13:21
  • If you use the parenthetical in your second sentence, you need to replace positioning with positions. (Cross out everything between the paired commas to see if it sounds right without it.) Either that or (as the one answer suggests) add something at the end. – Jason Bassford Supports Monica Sep 4 '19 at 2:32
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There is no real difference in strength. But there is a difference in meaning.

In sentence 1, "compares" is the verb of the sentence. You understand the intent (or even the entire meaning) even if there are no more details.

In sentence 2, there is no verb at all ("comparing" is not the verb), and if you do not add a verb somewhere, the sentence has no meaning. Or with other words (thanks @LucianSava): there is actually no sentence in example 2 - unless a verb will appear later.

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  • So, in essence, the 2nd sentence does not really make sense? Just clarifying. – R.Su Sep 3 '19 at 13:11
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    In essence, there's no a sentence in the example #2, @R.Su – Lucian Sava Sep 3 '19 at 13:12
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    Oh I see, without a verb, the sentence is complete facepalm – R.Su Sep 3 '19 at 13:15

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