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Can everyone be used for non living objects as in the following sentence

Everyone of the films you suggested are not worth seeing.

It looks weird but I found it in a book.

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Short answer: no.

You could say:

Every one of those films.

As two separate words "every one" can refer to inanimate objects that are part of a group.

However, "everyone" is reserved as a pronoun for people. It is interchangeable with the word "everybody".

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    In speech, they're just as distinct as they are in the (correct) written forms. Everyone will be given an apple, and every one will be ripe. The first has primary stress on the initial syllable of the "triplet", the second (two-word) one has primary stress on the final syllable. – FumbleFingers Reinstate Monica Sep 3 '19 at 15:51
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    ...actually, the space can represent a pause. I can imagine heavy stress on the initial syllable for both in, say, highly emphatic Everyone get out! And I mean every one! But in that case there would definitely be a noticeable pause before the final one. – FumbleFingers Reinstate Monica Sep 3 '19 at 15:55
  • Note that even with the edit the diction used here is unusual. "Every film you suggested", "Each of the films you suggested", and "All of the films you suggested" would all be more natural constructions. – Please stop being evil Sep 3 '19 at 23:35
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    @thedarkwanderer and "None of the films you suggested are worth seeing", which moves the negation up front, is more natural still IMO. But the "every one" construct is still reasonable in general. – hobbs Sep 4 '19 at 2:30

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