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In the phrases below may I omit the subject and verb before the word "not" and still make sense?

I could hardly recognize her when we met at a downtown restaurant last night. Not the skinny, shy girl we knew in our school days anymore.

I just came because your father said he needed my help. Not here to be treated like an idiot by you and your brothers like I used to be in the past.

So instead of writing "She is not the skinny, shy girl we knew..." could I use just "Not the skinny, shy girl we knew..."?

And instead of "I'm not here to be treated like an idiot..." could I use just "Not here to be treated like an idiot..."?

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    That makes them incomplete sentences. Consider using an em dash instead of a new sentence. I could hardly recognize her when we met at a downtown restaurant last night—not the skinny, shy girl we knew in our school days anymore. – Weather Vane Sep 3 '19 at 19:36
  • Hi, Weather, thanks a million for this tip, it really means a lot to me. Please, let me ask you just one thing more: can this "en dash" option also be used in the second example, I mean, would it make sense to say: I just came because your father said he needed my help - not here to be treated like an idiot by you and your brothers like I used to be in the past. – Itamar Sep 3 '19 at 20:26
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    I meant both sentences, and please use the dash and not a hyphen. – Weather Vane Sep 3 '19 at 20:55
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    There is nothing essentially wrong with sentence fragments if they are used for deliberate stylistic effect and in the right context. It's very common to find them in fiction, for instance. It's a matter of style, not grammar. And while they are often used in narrative, they are used even more frequently in dialogue. Both of the example sentences in the question sound like something from a fiction story—the first in narrative, and the second in dialogue; in those contexts, nobody can tell you that they are objectively wrong. – Jason Bassford Sep 4 '19 at 2:19

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