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Basically, I want to say something like

  • Don't leave the door open when you leave the office.

However, this sounds a bit awkward in my opinion because it has two leaves in a row. So, I thought about the other possible ways and came up with the following sentences.

Don't leave the door open if you are not going to be inside the office for a while.

Don't leave the door open if you are not going to be here for while.

They look to me as a bit wordy. I am wondering what is the common or idiomatic ways to say this.

  • Those last two sentences equate to 'Leave the door open if you're going to be here for a while' which might be the opposite of what you actually want to say? (Also James K's answer +1) – Smock Sep 13 at 11:00
  • @Smock hmm, I just don't want the office to be open while no one is there. – Cardinal Sep 13 at 15:28
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While there is nothing very bad about the repetition of leave, there is a very simple solution: You can change "don't leave the door open" to "close the door".

Close the door when you leave the office.

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