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What does "Boys rule, girls drool," mean? I googled it but did not get a straightforward answer.

It is a dialogue of Dumb And Dumber (2014) film.

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    Using code formatting means blind people who read the site will have to endure every letter pronounced out: ...What does Bee Oh Why Ess space Are You Ell Eee comma space Gee Eye Are Ell Ess space Dee Are Oh Oh Ell comma mean? It is a dialogue of Dee You Emm Bee space ... – Harper Sep 15 at 7:11
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This is an example of "playground language". It is the sort of thing that boys might say on the school playground, when they think no adults can hear them. It is a childish insult.

Saying "something rules" means you think that thing is great. This is a fairly common slang.

I love Game of Thrones. I think it rules.

On the other hand, to "drool" is when spit and saliva drips out of your mouth. You might drool when you see delicious food, but we say that someone who drools all the time must be a dirty and stupid person.

Specifically, the rule/drool pattern (and this use of the word rule in general) was popular among kids sometime around the late 80s or early to mid 90s. I'm not sure if it's entirely gone out of use since then, but it's less common. It wasn't specific to genders but any pair of things perceived as having a rivalry (or rivalry between their fans).

So the whole phrase means "Boys are great! Girls are stupid!" It isn't a very subtle message, but kids love rhyme and kids love being rude.

Adults would never usually say this – unless they were deliberately trying to sound childish for humorous effect. It is sexist and rude. It is in the film as a joke to show that the character is very childish.

  • You might be interested to know, I posted a related question on EL&U. – Mari-Lou A Sep 14 at 11:25
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    Incidentally, I'm pretty sure the more common usage of this phrase has the genders the other way around. This may be part of the joke. – Darrel Hoffman Sep 14 at 13:27
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    The fact that this phrases uses two rhyming words is a big part of why it exists – Nayuki Sep 14 at 14:21
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    Specifically, the rule/drool pattern (and this use of the word rule in general) was popular among kids sometime around the late 80s or early to mid 90s. I'm not sure if it's entirely gone out of use since then, but it's less common. It wasn't specific to genders but any pair of things perceived as having a rivalry (or rivalry between their fans). – R.. Sep 14 at 16:18
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    You say "adults would usually never say this", but "EEs [electrical engineers] rule. MEs [mechanical engineers] drool" used to be a slogan around my office. (Not that it was used unironically, but anyway) – The Photon Sep 14 at 23:20

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