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Oxford dictionary gives this example sentence about "aside from".

A full scale search was launched and thankfully she was found unharmed, aside from suffering from the cold.

Is it reasonable to say "aside from" means a set does not include something.

and then the example sentence could be

what she was unharmed does not include suffering from the cold.

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You've got the right idea, but your sample sentence doesn't make sense. Start from the sentence you quote and say it this way

A full scale search was launched and thankfully she was found unharmed, not including suffering from the cold.

The sentence is correct and grammatical this way and most people would understand it, but it's a little awkward and sounds like it was written in the 19th century. Another way to say it would be

A full scale search was launched and thankfully she was found unharmed, except for suffering from the cold.

  • Thanks for your answer. Is "not including" or "aside from" the one sounds like the 19th century? – fu DL Sep 14 at 10:18
  • Sorry about the confusion. The version with 'not including' is the one I meant. – dwilli Sep 15 at 4:08
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In idiomatic English, "aside from" means "other than" or "except for". One definition is "used for saying that something exists, is true, or happens in addition to something else"

Your version of the example sentence isn't quite grammatically correct

"that she was unharmed did not include suffering from cold"

but you would never hear a native speaker put it that way.

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